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public:favourite_quotes [2018/03/31 01:38]
127.0.0.1 external edit
public:favourite_quotes [2018/12/07 00:40]
fangfufu
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 "They say that to do injustice is, by nature, good; to suffer injustice, evil; but that the evil is greater than the good. And so when men have both done and suffered injustice and have had experience of both, not being able to avoid the one and obtain the other, they think that they had better agree among themselves to have neither; hence there arise laws and mutual covenants; and that which is ordained by law is termed by them lawful and just. This they affirm to be the origin and nature of justice; --it is a mean or compromise, between the best of all, which is to do injustice and not be punished, and the worst of all, which is to suffer injustice without the power of retaliation;​ and justice, being at a middle point between the two, is tolerated not as a good, but as the lesser evil, and honoured by reason of the inability of men to do injustice. For no man who is worthy to be called a man would ever submit to such an agreement if he were able to resist; he would be mad if he did. Such is the received account, Socrates, of the nature and origin of justice. " <​cite>​Glaucon</​cite>​ "They say that to do injustice is, by nature, good; to suffer injustice, evil; but that the evil is greater than the good. And so when men have both done and suffered injustice and have had experience of both, not being able to avoid the one and obtain the other, they think that they had better agree among themselves to have neither; hence there arise laws and mutual covenants; and that which is ordained by law is termed by them lawful and just. This they affirm to be the origin and nature of justice; --it is a mean or compromise, between the best of all, which is to do injustice and not be punished, and the worst of all, which is to suffer injustice without the power of retaliation;​ and justice, being at a middle point between the two, is tolerated not as a good, but as the lesser evil, and honoured by reason of the inability of men to do injustice. For no man who is worthy to be called a man would ever submit to such an agreement if he were able to resist; he would be mad if he did. Such is the received account, Socrates, of the nature and origin of justice. " <​cite>​Glaucon</​cite>​
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-"The law doesn'​t protect people. People protect the law. People have always detested evil and sought out a righteous way of living. Their feelings... The accumulation of those people'​s feelings are the law. They are neither the provisions nor the system. They are the fragile and irreplaceable feelings that everyone carries in their hearts. Compared to the power of anger and hatred, they are something can quite easily break down. People have prayed for a better world throughout time, in order for those prayers to hold meaning. In order for those prayers to hold meaning, we have to try our best to protect it to the very end. We just cannot give up on it." 
-<​cite>​Akane Tsunemori</​cite>​ 
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-"No matter which you chose, you would have borne a sin either way. Those who look away from battle and choose humiliation,​ will someday find themselves visited with both battle and humiliation. All a man can do is choose the sin he feels most satisfied with." <​cite>​Marquess Casel</​cite>​ 
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-"My own life has been spent chronicling the rise and fall of human systems, 
-and I am convinced that we are terribly vulnerable. ​ ...  We should be 
-reluctant to turn back upon the frontier of this epoch. Space is indifferent 
-to what we do; it has no feeling, no design, no interest in whether or not 
-we grapple with it. But we cannot be indifferent to space, because the grand, 
-slow march of intelligence has brought us, in our generation, to a point 
-from which we can explore and understand and utilize it. To turn back now 
-would be to deny our history, our capabilities. 
-<​cite>​James A. Michener</​cite>​ 
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-If your own lie doesn'​t fool you, it will not deceive others. 
-<​cite>​Crusch Karsten</​cite>​ 
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 <​cite>​ <​cite>​
 https://​tech.slashdot.org/​comments.pl?​sid=10964839&​cid=54964677 https://​tech.slashdot.org/​comments.pl?​sid=10964839&​cid=54964677
 +</​cite>​
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 +Dad taught us that public service is noble and necessary; that one can serve with integrity and hold true to the important values, like faith and family. He strongly believed that it was important to give back to the community and country in which one lived. He recognized that serving others enriched the giver’s soul. To us, his was the brightest of a thousand points of light.
 +
 +In victory, he shared credit. When he lost, he shouldered the blame. He accepted that failure is part of living a full life, but taught us never to be defined by failure. He showed us how setbacks can strengthen.
 +<​cite>​
 +https://​www.nytimes.com/​2018/​12/​05/​us/​politics/​george-w-bush-eulogy.html
 </​cite>​ </​cite>​
 </​blockquote>​ </​blockquote>​
  • public/favourite_quotes.txt
  • Last modified: 2019/06/19 07:46
  • by fangfufu